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January 28, 2016

Artstor-ITHAKA Community Letter

To our creators, partners, and users:

We are writing to you as a valued member of our community to share the good news that Artstor, the nonprofit provider of the Artstor Digital Library of images and the Shared Shelf platform for cataloguing and digital asset management, will now operate under the umbrella of its fellow nonprofit ITHAKA, the organization that currently operates three other services: JSTOR, Portico and Ithaka S+R. As you may know, Artstor,… Read more»

January 19, 2016

Inside Higher Ed examines growth in JSTOR’s ebook program

The Books at JSTOR program is growing quickly and now offers 40,000 titles from 100 participating publishers. A recent article in Inside Higher Ed attributes the program’s success to the popularity of the JSTOR platform among student and faculty researchers, which helps increase discovery of the ebooks. The article also discusses JSTOR’s DRM-free model, the financial benefits to libraries, the increase in foreign-language content, and more.

Read the full articleRead more»

January 6, 2016

New content: Botanische Staatssammlung München artwork

We are delighted to let you know we have added two new unique collections to Global Plants:

Botanische Staatssammlung München Artwork – Water Colours of Fungi by Fritz Wohlfarth

This collection consists of watercolors of fungi painted by Fritz Wohlfarth (1906–2005). Dr. Fritz Wohlfarth studied at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany) and obtained a Ph.D. degree in chemistry. For many years he worked as a field sales representative for a varnish company in Munich. During his tours around Germany and… Read more»

December 18, 2015

New publishers added to Books at JSTOR–and more news

Books at JSTOR has seen tremendous growth over the course of 2015. One hundred leading scholarly publishers now participate in the program, contributing 38,000 titles—including 2,250 published in 2015. Library participation has increased to more than 700 institutions in 40 countries. Read on for additional highlights from this year.

New publishers: JSTOR has partnered with 100 distinguished presses. We are pleased to welcome the publishers that joined in November/December:

Anthem Press
Aspen Institute
Gerlach Press
Intellect… Read more»

December 8, 2015

New tools for interdisciplinary researchers

December 8, 2015—New York, NY and Seattle, WA—The JSTOR Labs team recently partnered with Dr. Jevin West’s team at the University of Washington DataLab to test and develop tools to help researchers introduce themselves to key topics and publications from other fields. The results of their work have been incorporated into JSTOR Sustainability—a new site, currently in beta, that contains a broad range of scholarly articles and research reports dealing with environmental stresses and their impact on… Read more»

December 3, 2015

Annotating all knowledge, JSTOR joins coalition of innovators

JSTOR is part of a newly formed coalition of organizations working to annotate the web. This group of 40+ knowledge platforms, libraries, and publishers is being led by fellow not-for-profit Hypothes.is.

Read more about this effort in Nature and on hypothes.is, which features a series of video interviews that give insight into the community of collaborators and where JSTOR’s own Alex Humphreys discusses the importance of learning by doing as we try to make web annotation a powerful new… Read more»

November 3, 2015

JSTOR announces fees for 2016

JSTOR is pleased to announce that for the 19th consecutive year, annual access fees (AAF) for the Arts & Sciences and Life Sciences Archive collections will remain unchanged. In fact, AAFs for all JSTOR Archive Collections and Primary Source products will remain unchanged for 2016.* Each year, JSTOR gives careful consideration to its participation fees. We recognize that the current economic environment in higher education in the United States, the continued struggles of economies in Asia, the Eurozone, and Latin America, and the loss of purchasing power in many countries due to local currency devaluations versus the US dollar have had especially difficult financial implications for many institutions. Our ability to continue “holding the line” on participation fees for 2016 is possible because of the breadth of participation we have been able to build over the past two decades from libraries around the world, and we are incredibly grateful for that continued support. Read more»

September 1, 2015

Livingstone’s Zambezi expedition

Livingstone’s Zambezi Expedition is a beta site built by JSTOR Labs in collaboration with JSTOR’s Content Development team based on David Livingstone’s African expedition along the Zambezi and Shire Rivers from 1858-1864. The site provides students, teachers, and scholars with a greater understanding of the scientific, historical, and cultural contexts of the expedition, offering users both a high-level overview of the expedition and the ability to perform a detailed analysis of the materials.

The resource brings together content from JSTORRead more»

August 18, 2015

Partner interview: María Mercedes Arbo

María Mercedes ArboWe interviewed long-time Global Plants partner and respected taxonomist María Mercedes Arbo, who told us about the evolution of botanical research from the 1970s to today and mused about the direction botany might be headed. Among other topics, Dr. Arbo discussed the role of technology and best practices for effective research. As a respected botanist in your field with a long career, you must marvel at what can now be done through projects like Global Plants. How have you seen this have the greatest impact on the work of botanists? I began working in Plant Taxonomy around 1972, in Corrientes, where Botanical Research had started in 1965. The Herbarium was just beginning, and the Library was very small. The main Argentine Botanical Libraries were located at Buenos Aires, 1000 km away. In those years not even photocopies were common. I still keep the photocopy of Urban’s monography on Turneraceae (1883), which I got in Buenos Aires (Darwinian Institute), made on a special photosensible paper. You could request material on loan to each Herbarium, but it wasn't easy, depended on surface or airmail, you had to write a letter, wait sometimes several months to receive an answer, and loans, logically, were partial. In those years, almost the only way to study a good number of the nomenclatural types was to travel to Europe to visit the herbaria of various countries, with different currency and legal standards... Read more»