On September 6, 2011, we made journal content in JSTOR published prior to 1923 in the United States and prior to 1870 elsewhere freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world.  This “Early Journal Content” includes discourse and scholarship in the arts and humanities, economics and politics, and in mathematics and other sciences.  It includes nearly 500,000 articles from more than 200 journals. This represents 6% of the content on JSTOR.


While JSTOR currently provides access to scholarly content to people through a growing network of more than 8,000 institutions in 160 countries, we also know there are independent scholars and other people that we are still not reaching in this way.  Making the Early Journal Content freely available was an initial step in a larger effort to provide more access options to the content on JSTOR for these individuals. Following the release of the Early Journal Content, we launched the Register & Read beta program, which offers free, read-online access to more recent content for individual scholars and researchers who register for a MyJSTOR account.


We encourage broad use of the Early Journal Content, including the ability to reuse it for non-commercial purposes. For more information, please refer to the Early Journal Content section in our Terms & Conditions of Use. A brief video tutorial about how to access this content is also available. We also provide a free Early Journal Content data bundle for text mining purposes that includes full-text OCR and article and title-level metadata.


Please read our Frequently Asked Questions if you have additional questions about the Early Journal Content or contact us at support@jstor.org.

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